Wandering the wild, wild East. Traversing the stomping grounds of Communism, Byzantium, and the Ottoman Empire; the motherland. Join me.

What’s this?

Oh, just another ancient hill fort. No big deal.

(But seriously, It is really not uncommon to see random old fortifications as you drive along through the former Yugoslavia, in varying states of ruin. Many of them seem as lost to the heritage ministries as they are to the passerby but I would love to one day do a tour of them.)

Along the Magistrala we saw a few gunner bunkers. I believe them to be either WWII era or soon after (perhaps as post-war fortifications). These are not uncommon in the Balkans, with a variety of them to be found along major arteries, particularly by borders. The first was on the highway itself, with the second one close to the border with Herzegovina.

These are pictures taken driving down the Magistrala, which is a highway route along the Makarska Riviera into Bosnia-Herzegovina. The day we drove down was just a lot of blue sky, blue water, and very pretty sea-side home.

At this point, you’re asking yourself, “but Proxy Adventurer, how do the modern Croats live?”
And I know I said no more night shots, so here’s one of modern buildings at dusk, just as the sun diseappears on the horizon. So ends our stay in Split - from the perilous journey, to the beautiful emotions the city and our friends evoked.

Next stop, the Magistrala, Makarska Riviera, and Bosnia-Herzegovina. Stay tuned!

At this point, you’re asking yourself, “but Proxy Adventurer, how do the modern Croats live?”

And I know I said no more night shots, so here’s one of modern buildings at dusk, just as the sun diseappears on the horizon. So ends our stay in Split - from the perilous journey, to the beautiful emotions the city and our friends evoked.

Next stop, the Magistrala, Makarska Riviera, and Bosnia-Herzegovina. Stay tuned!

Some houses within the Diocletian complex. Most of them are quite old, and they’ve reportedly “discovered” Romanesque houses within the complex itself. Still in existence all those years later.

Lucky people - they can say they live in a palace!

More inside Diocletian’s palace - an example of non-Roman structures built right into the skeleton of the enclosure.

Here are some shots of the interior of the large complex that is Diocletian’s Palace, during the day. These were shot during a festival called the Days of Diocletian, where tribute is simulated to the emperor and there is a grand ceremony of “Diocletian” coming out to greet the people. It was also the hottest day of the trip (I awoke literally suffocating), so I wasn’t keen to stand around waiting for one of the soldiers, but I got a good picture of a very nice looking Roman troop.

Proof that Split actually exists in the day time too! Taken by the main cruise harbour.

OK this is the last of the night shots of Split. A small marina also along the riviera, towards the older part of the city.

OK this is the last of the night shots of Split. A small marina also along the riviera, towards the older part of the city.

A shot of the main marina and cruiseliner harbour, taken from the Split riviera.

A shot of the main marina and cruiseliner harbour, taken from the Split riviera.